DSCN0739

I often have to ask myself who I want to be when I grow up. This question usually comes to me when I am tired, and my only desire is to curl up on the couch with a good book, instead of sloshing around in knee-deep mud and water. When the temptation to turn around and stay inside is too great, I have to stop and ask myself that dreaded question: “What kind of Farm Wife do I really want to be?” That’s when I take everything into perspective.

I want to be the kind of Farm Wife who:

Who isn’t afraid of a little bit of snow and ice – even if it is a very rare occurrence here in the South.  She’ll just bundle up and head out, knowing that the animals are just as miserable as she is, yet she has the luxury of coming back inside and sitting next to a warm fire.

Doesn’t think twice about the stinky, back-breaking labor of cleaning out the chicken coop, and instead, thinks about the health of her chickens and the bounty of fresh eggs they offer up as thanks.

Doesn’t screech when her boot gets stuck in the mud and causes her to lose her balance and fall into the cold slick mud, and instead considers it a minor inconvenience compared to the beef she puts in her freezer from the cows she just fed. After all, they’re giving their lives to say thank you – a little bit of mud doesn’t compare.

Doesn’t gripe about the sweat-inducing heat in the greenhouse while she is spending hours bumping up seedlings. Nor does she worry about the added labor of weeding the garden and tending to the harvest. It is those very green plants that will be providing food for her family, and income from the sale of the plants and vegetables.

Doesn’t mind doing a last minute whirlwind cleaning of her house when she spies unexpected company pulling through the gate. It’s those very people who bring joy to the Farm Wife’s heart, and is providing a break from the work.

Doesn’t care if the downed tree is straddling the creek and is difficult to get to. She knows the extra effort will help to warm her body and soul in the freezing days of the winter.

Doesn’t mind getting kicked at during milking time. She is just thankful for the milk that is given for fresh milk, butter, cheese and yogurt. Which also ends up saving her money at the grocery store.

Doesn’t mind the long, hard hours in the kitchen preparing fruits and vegetables for canning. Long before the job is done, she can see in her mind’s eye the cellar shelves lined with soups, vegetables, fruits, jams and jellies that will sustain her family through the winter.

Doesn’t miss one minute of sleep when she has to stay up all night caring for a sick animal, or being woken by the phone to find out her cows have escaped – again. Instead, she understands that it’s all part of the job.

Doesn’t blink an eye at dropping everything to help a neighbor. It brings a sense of community to her world. Besides, chores will always be there. Your neighbors might not.

Keeps a prayerful heart and a countenance of joy, even through the trials and tribulations. After all, she knows that God has everything in control, so why waste precious time worrying?

Being a Farm Wife isn’t the easiest job in the world, but the rewards are overwhelming. Am I the Farm Wife I want to be? Not yet, but I am working on it. It’s just that sitting in cold wet mud and having it soak through to the skin, and then being joyful about it, is a difficult obstacle to overcome.

What kind of person do you want to be when you grow up? Let us know, but please be gentle. I’m having enough trouble making it through my own list – I’m not sure if I want to read things that I have to add to it!